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The Technicolor Dreams Of Perri Prinz - Tis The Season For Christians to Tarnish Their Image Again [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]

Tis The Season For Christians to Tarnish Their Image Again [Nov. 23rd, 2013|04:28 am]
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[Music |Happy Holidays.]

It's not even Thanksgiving yet, and nikolinni is already hitting me with the "Happy Holidays" controversy. So I guess it's time to get my annual lecture on this subject out of the way by posting my response to Niko here.

When talking to someone you know is Christian, and when you are referring specifically to Christmas, it is proper to say "Merry Christmas."

"Happy Holidays" was invented, not to accommodate people of different faiths, but because there is more than one holiday in this section of the year. Between Thanksgiving and New Years, a whole block of holidays, all of which tend to help carry on a single festive spirit. You say "Happy Holidays" when you refer to the entire holiday season.

The next time someone bugs you for saying "Happy Holidays," say to them, "Oh, I beg your pardon. Merry Christmas, and may your Thanksgiving and New Years bring you all the misery you desire." It is proper to say this because they have rudely rejected your blessing upon their other holidays, and in all likelihood hurt your feelings in the process, effectively bringing misery to your own holiday season. And those who wish to spread misery during the holiday season should not be denied it if they favor it so much.

Feel free to remind anyone else troubled by this matter that the term "Happy Holidays" originates from a song in a 1942 Bing Crosby movie called "Holiday Inn." The movie is about all holidays, not just Christmas, and when you give this greeting you are wishing happiness for all holidays, not just Christmas. And you may also remind people that it always was and still is considered the height of rude and undesirable behavior to receive this greeting ungratefully.

Also note that if you should watch "Holiday Inn" to familiarize yourself with the origin of the term, you will also see the origin of "White Christmas," the most popular Christmas song of all time.

In a sense Bing Crosby is something of a Christian icon, but he is especially a Christmas icon. So when a Christian messes with Bing Crosby, they are messing with the good image of their own religion. A Christianity that no longer respects Bing Crosby is a Christianity no one should respect. It is a Christianity that has lost it's way and forsaken everything we once thought of as virtuous about that religion and its holiday.

Therefore, keep the holidays as Bing Crosby would bid you to, and you will be in the proper spirit, even if the Christians of this generation would curse the proper spirit. That does not mean the rest of us are required to follow suit.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: marauderosu
2013-11-23 09:28 pm (UTC)

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Amen!
[User Picture]From: symian
2013-11-24 04:50 am (UTC)

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I agree.
[User Picture]From: zorro456
2013-11-24 07:19 am (UTC)

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A Humble Response.

Let small kids believe in Santa till figure it out for themselves.

Exchange a few gifts and show the best of the Legend of Santa Claus.

Even as a myth, it is a pretty good myth spreading and advocating Peace to every part of the world.
[User Picture]From: jarrellwoods
2013-11-24 12:31 pm (UTC)

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I haven't seen one yet this year, but last year, there was a bumper sticker on an SUV, only it wasn't on the bumper, it was high up so it would be eye-level with whoever stopped behind them at a light. It said "We say 'Merry Christmas'" And I know my reaction was like, 'well, la te da!' Just reading that made me feel uncomfortable, like they were probably so easily offended, or their love so conditional, I'd probably not want to talk with them. That may have been just assumption on my part, but that was my impression.

Edited at 2013-11-24 12:31 pm (UTC)
[User Picture]From: bixylshuftan
2013-11-24 05:46 pm (UTC)

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*sings* "Happy Holidays, to you." ;-)